Saturday March 17th, 2012


I’m sure you have seen a movie with subtitles before, but have you ever seen a play with subtitles?

We’re in Paris for the week end, and tonight we went to watch a Lebanese play (we thought it would be nice to encourage our fellow countrymen coming from so far to play in a foreign country).

Of course the play was in Arabic, but there are French who are interesting in seeing what other countries’ theatrical milieu has to offer; so what should be done in this case? Translate it. How? By adding a projector that will show the subtitles somewhere in the theater above the players’ heads.

If you think about it, the idea is not that bad; but when you’re not used to it, it feels weird “shall I read the subtitles or listen to what they are saying? But I do not want to move my attention from the action going on.” Eventually I was able to concentrate on the play without worrying about the moving text, but it took me 10 minutes to do so (considering that the play lasted only for one hour, it’s quite a big time :P)

On another hand, as usual when I go to Paris, I bring you pictures from a new place I discovered or one of my favorite places in the city of light. So today’s choice is coming from “Le Bon Marché”; this is the oldest mall in the city, and it’s the one that inspired the French novelist Emile Zola to write about in his book “Au Bonheur des Dames” (this is one of the best book in history, if you haven’t read it I highly advise you to do so).

 

The hall in “Le Bon Marché”

See you tomorrow!

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Comments
3 Responses to “Saturday March 17th, 2012”
  1. The stranger in the park says:

    They do this in the opéra 😉
    PS: I prefer “la grande épicerie” to the mall….mmmm!!!

  2. Magnésium says:

    Surtitling: right Opera are good in that, as they are generally played their original language.

    “Bon Marché” is so old that it took enough notoriety to become “pas bon marché” at all!

    Nice pictures! None of the “grande épicerie”? Never enter there when hungry!

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